A Door in Arches National Park

I missed posting on TD the past couple of weeks; first missed post was due to a weekend trip to Las Vegas to meet a buddy to entice the betting gods to rain some luck and fun on us.  The betting gods allowed us to have some fun but refused our wishes for luck; as they say, “better luck next time”.  On my return trip home from Vegas, I had a couple of hours to get ready to accompany my wife and her sister to hop on the plane, again, with a destination to Utah to see their national parks and capture some photos so that was the reason for my second missed posting on TD.

Some new readers of these posts might wonder what TD is.  Best I can explain is there is a Door Monarch named Norm Frampton, living in the north (just like Santa) who grants door wishes to those wanting to see photos of doors accompanied by some stories or historical facts from his minions around the world.  If you desire to become a door minion, visit his Thursday Doors website, read his post for the week and click on the button that looks like a blue frog to open the Door to other minions’ posts and join in if you wish.

My contribution this week was not what I had expected to find while in Arches National Park where the only doors I expected to see were the Rangers’ kiosk at the park entrance or the Visitors Center.  Everything in Arches National Park is outdoors, excluding the restrooms.  Before taking this trip, I consulted my photographer guru friend, Deborah (former TD blogger), and she suggested that I had to visit Delicate Arch while there.  After seeing Deborah’s prior photo of Delicate Arch my wife was determined to see that monument, with or without me, so I made the sacrifice and hiked the 1.3 miles each way walking up 500 ft. at an incline at approximately 60 degrees (the elevation was approximately 4,800 ft.).; it wasn’t too much of a sacrifice because I wanted to see this arch too.

At the beginning of the Delicate Arch trail near the parking lot, I saw the door (or building for this post):

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The door:

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Other perspectives of the historical building:

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This building had no door but doorways qualify for TD posts (probably a root cellar or storage building):

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And views of Delicate Arch:

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The hike back was a little easier but going downward is still an effort.

Thanks for visiting my blog and thanks to Norm 2.0 for his Thursday Doors blog.  For more blogs and photos of doors by others please go to: Thursday Doors.

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27 thoughts on “A Door in Arches National Park

  1. Really like that door. I visited Arches about 20 years ago, (missed that door though) your shots of Delicate Arch brought back good memories. It was quite a climb in the heat of July, but worth it. :>)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks; the hike was a challenge which I almost didn’t do because Arches was only opened 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays to Thursdays due to construction and we couldn’t get the sunrise or moon shots but my wife really wanted to hike it so we did it in the morning after shooting the sunrise at Mesa Arch. Glad to see the monument in person.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Norm! Do the bucket list things that require good knees and hips first and don’t wait too long. Delicate Arch was a fantastic monument to see but it was a challenge to get up there. Deborah told me she and friends did it early in the morning in the dark and I now know how difficult that was.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Haha “Do the bucket list things that require good knees and hips first and don’t wait too long” – very wise words, indeed!

        I always enjoy reading your explanations of Thursday Doors as much as I enjoy your photos! Well done on both counts in this post 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Great photos. I think arches count as doors, too. I mean, you can go through them. But, the doors on the building, and the building itself are also very cool. I’m lad you made the hike. Deborah would never steer you wrong.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I’m so glad you all made to up to see Delicate Arch and didn’t miss any cairn’s so you didn’t get lost. The last time I went up it was O’Dark Thirty, and up where the trail turns to sand I walked right through a large spider web that I didn’t see with my headlamp! EWW! I felt itchy, and creepy all day. It was a gorgeous sunrise so it was worth that too. 🙂 Thanks for jogging that memory. 🙂

    That’s Wolfe’s Ranch Cabin. Isn’t it cool! There’s some neat history on a plaque about it, or there was on one of my visits there. Here’s a link about Wolfe and that cabin.
    https://www.nps.gov/arch/learn/historyculture/wolfe-ranch.htm

    I’m also thrilled to hear you had a sunrise at Mesa Arch! I can’t wait to see your images, and hear about your experience there.

    Looking forward to seeing you Saturday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Deborah! Glad I consulted you before leaving; your suggestions were very helpful! I now know why you said Mesa Arch is for the sunrise (west was behind us so no matter how much I tried I would never get a sunset from there) 😉 I did manage to get the full moon over the Canyonlands canyon!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree with Dan that arches could as doors … and that is an awesome arch!!
    I also really like the photo of the root cellar, in spite of the rope keeping people away. It’s a funny little building on a funny little angle 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Joanne! For me, the hike up to Delicate Arch might be compared to your coastal trail hikes (but on a smaller scale); the old joints add more effort but I can say I made it and saw it and stood under it.
      The old historic buildings were a bonus and Deborah left a link about the Wolfe house in her comments which is an interesting read. Have a good weekend!

      Like

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